Letter Sounds Scavenger Hunt

file-7

This is a great activity for getting the kids up and out of the classroom!

The format goes with WONDERS kindergarten reading curriculum, but anyone can use this.

Each student gets a worksheet with different spaces (rooms) in the school (playground, office, etc…) on it. I give students a clip board or hard surface to write on. We walk around the school, and stop in each room listed. I give students time to look around the room and write down words that begin with the letter of the week.

When we get back to the classroom, we talk about the words we wrote down.

*head to my teachers pay teachers page to download the product.

Letter Sounds Scavenger Hunt TPT

COMMON CORE:

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RF.K.1
Demonstrate understanding of the organization and basic features of print.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RF.K.3.A
Demonstrate basic knowledge of one-to-one letter-sound correspondences by producing the primary sound or many of the most frequent sounds for each consonant.

 

Build the Alphabet

file-6

I started doing this letter building activity this year, and the kids love it! It’s definitely a challenge for my approaching-level students, but I find it to be a great opportunity for the students to help each other.

There are shapes to build each letter, upper and lowercase. Kids get practice cutting and gluing and it also helps with organizational skills. My students glue the letters onto a “letter monster” worksheet, but I have also asked students to glue them in interactive notebooks.

I print the letter shapes on card stock so they’re easier to cut.

*head to my teachers pay teachers page to download the product.

Build the Alphabet TPT

COMMON CORE

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RF.K.1
Demonstrate understanding of the organization and basic features of print.

Cherries on Top!

I use this activity for my lower level kinders, and also my students who are starting to add. It’s great for math centers, and/or a math station for kids who finish early.

I laminate the “milkshakes” and include visa-vis pens for easy clean up and ongoing use! I am working on some retro hats the kids can wear while they do it…but my crafting skills might not be up to par for that ;).

*head to my teachers pay teachers page to download the product (it’s free).

TPT Cherries on Top

COMMON CORE

CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.K.CC.A.3 Write numbers from 0-20. Represent a number of objects with a written numeral 0-20.

CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.K.CC.B.4 Understand the relationship between numbers and quantities; connect counting to cardinality.

CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.K.CC.B.4.A When counting objects, say the number names in the standard order, pairing each object with one and only one number name and each number name with one and only one object.

CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.K.CC.B.4.B Understand that the last number name said tells the number of objects counted. The number of objects is the same regardless of their arrangement or the order in which they were counted.

Apple Counting Mats

file-5

These apple mats are great for students who are new at counting! I use them with everyone at the beginning of the year, but continue using them with my lower-level math groups all year round. They love using play dough, but you could use counters or flat marbles as well.

apple-counting-mats

COMMON CORE:

CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.K.CC.B.4: Understand the relationship between numbers and quantities; connect counting to cardinality.
CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.K.CC.B.4.A: When counting objects, say the number names in the standard order, pairing each object with one and only one number name and each number name with one and only one object.
CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.K.CC.B.4.B: Understand that the last number name said tells the number of objects counted. The number of objects is the same regardless of their arrangement or the order in which they were counted.
CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.K.CC.B.4.C: Understand that each successive number name refers to a quantity that is one larger.
CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.K.CC.B.5: Count to answer “how many?” questions about as many as 20 things arranged in a line, a rectangular array, or a circle, or as many as 10 things in a scattered configuration; given a number from 1-20, count out that many objects.